Pumpkin coconut soup

So fall/winter/the holiday season is upon us, and I am really excited to share this recipe with you!  It is a luscious, rich soup that makes me happy that it is so freezing outside!  It was originally going to be adapted from Global Gourmet, but as usual, I have tweaked the recipe to my own tastes and to more accessible items in the Japanese supermarket–in particular the 金時人参 (きんときにんじん) kintoki ninjin, or Kyoto red carrot.  This carrot is a blood red color and is so sweet and much better than the regular carrot!  The recipe also calls for only using the white part of the scallions, which apparently have a more mild flavor than the green part.  The accompanying photo was taken by my talented friend Cat.  I got to be a model for a day.  Please check out her website!

 

pumpkin coconut soup
Soup in a breadbowl!

Pumpkin coconut soup

Prep time: 20 minutes                Cooking time: 20-25 minutes              Servings: 6

Budget for ingredients: ¥1000

Equipment:

1 grater
Tongs
1 masher
1 pot

Ingredients:

1 kabocha pumpkin (the only kind you can get here, with the green rind)
2 kintoku carrots
1 T fresh grated ginger
1 T chopped garlic
3 blocks of consommé
1 bunch of scallions (only the white part), chopped
1 can coconut milk
1 package Italian parsley, chopped
Juice from 1 lime
Salt and white pepper to taste

Directions:

1. Remove seeds from the pumpkin.   Wash and place in pot, and add enough water that 2/3 of the pumpkin is covered.  I leave the pumpkin in halves.

2. Chop carrots into coins and drop it in the pot.  Add grated ginger,garlic, and consommé.

3.  Bring to a boil, and remove pumpkin peel with tongs after it has softened.

4. Although this is probably not the correct procedure, I usually just stick my masher in at this point to mush up the mixture.  Much faster than just stirring with a wooden spoon!  Slightly dangerous but whatever.

5.  Turn down the heat, and add in chopped scallions and coconut milk.

6. Heat the soup through without boiling.  Add parsley, juice from the lime, and salt and pepper to taste.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s